Text 31 Aug 471,957 notes

angle-of-depression:

nothingcorporate:

opinions on abortions are kinda like nipples

everyone has them but women’s are a little bit more relevant 

But all you ever see are men’s

(Source: uncooler)

Quote 31 Aug 2,559 notes

The problem here is that these squealing man-children, so desperate to keep women out of their precious games, want it both ways. They want gaming to be taken seriously as a culture and art form, while at the same time throwing an unbelievable tantrum when subjected to serious criticism. This is ludicrous and immature on so many levels. Gaming isn’t for you, anymore. Gaming is for everyone. Everyone gets to have their say, to make their criticism, and gaming doesn’t need you to defend it.

The only thing left for these people to do is put their toys back in the pram and huddle together as the tide rises against them, until they wake up in five year’s time and realise that Assassin’s Creed 7 was actually a pretty good game, even though they had to waste three precious seconds flicking the gender over to ‘male’ on the character creation screen so they can feel comfortable again. Change is inevitable, especially when half of the freaking gamers in the country are women and actually want to play some games that don’t treat them like disposable trash.

So, here’s another change for you: if you really think feminism, or women, are destroying games, or that LGBT people and LGBT relationships have no place in games, or that games in any way belong to you or are “under attack” from political correctness or “social justice warriors”: please leave this website. I don’t want your clicks, I don’t want your hits, I don’t want your traffic. Leave now and please don’t come back.

Quote 31 Aug 81,713 notes
One year, I taught this (Sociological theory) class and only used female writers. The journals were written by women, the textbook was written by females. Do you know what kind of responses I got on my student evaluations that year? {…} That I was biased, that I was only looking from one point of view… that I was basically a man eater. That’s the kind of things I’d get from the students… The semester before, I used only male writers. Do you think I got any kind of feedback like that then?
— 

"Not a single word."

Dr Rebecca Erikson, my professor, in her introduction of epistemology and challenging the main narrative

(via marloscruzin)

I like this quote because it underscores not only how important it is to create a counternarrative to the dominant ones, but how much opposition, backlash and pushback there is to even the simplest challenges to the status quo.

My position? That just means we need to push even harder.

(via medievalpoc)

(Source: rafrousseau)

Photo 31 Aug 20,006 notes
via grant pls.
Photo 30 Aug 243,893 notes booksneak:

ew-romance:

theother-worldlyninja:

moraniarty:

pwnator:

kiriloid:

tdrloid:

pelicaneggs:

jiinkiie2:

garrys-wife:

Wow, that case must be JAM-packed.

It’d butter be

looks like shes bready to go

my flight had better be rye-t on time

i’d hate for her to be forced to wheat

I bet that costs a lot of dough.

that case is toastally awesome

That case must be handy when you’re crumbing and going.

i really knead that bag

That suitcase looks like bread.

booksneak:

ew-romance:

theother-worldlyninja:

moraniarty:

pwnator:

kiriloid:

tdrloid:

pelicaneggs:

jiinkiie2:

garrys-wife:

Wow, that case must be JAM-packed.

It’d butter be

looks like shes bready to go

my flight had better be rye-t on time

i’d hate for her to be forced to wheat

I bet that costs a lot of dough.

that case is toastally awesome

That case must be handy when you’re crumbing and going.

i really knead that bag

That suitcase looks like bread.

(Source: )

via EGOLEGUME.
Video 29 Aug 36,208 notes

professorfangirl:

mediamattersforamerica:

The internet’s most beloved geek, Wil Wheaton, calls out misogyny in gaming, and confronts the men who attack him for doing so. Incredible. 

Wil Wheaton, mensch.

(Source: twitter.com)

via EGOLEGUME.
Quote 29 Aug 119,839 notes
If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also
— 
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

Video 28 Aug 203,807 notes

diarrheaworldstarhiphop:

sizvideos:

Video

this fat asshole

The second gif he’s like “NO STOP, I CAN DO IT MYSELF!”

Photo 28 Aug 8,693 notes sashkash:

Freckle Friday | Angry freckled Cecil.

sashkash:

Freckle Friday | Angry freckled Cecil.

via EGOLEGUME.
Video 28 Aug 127,696 notes

spaghettiseven:

flies to 3 different countries in 3 mins

via EGOLEGUME.

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